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We’ve moved to the spiffy new nortonliterature.com and encourage you to follow us there. Fair Matter will remain but will no longer be updated.

Need some incentive? One of our first 100 followers on that new blog, selected at random, will receive a free W. W. Norton tote bag and critical edition. Go go go!


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housingworksbookstore:

If a bookshelf and a comfy chair met in a bar, hit it off, and had a baby, the result would be this chair, from furniture company Nobody & Co. It’s called the Bibliochaise, and for lazy readers (aren’t we all?), it’s the library of the future. The Bibliochaise — which really looks more like a throne — holds five meters of books, which works out to about 300 of your favorite classics. (via The Bibliochaise Bookshelf Chair Is a Miniature Library for Your Apartment | Swimmingly)

300 books, you say? And how many Norton Critical Editions are there? Nearly 300, you say? Hmmm…

housingworksbookstore:

If a bookshelf and a comfy chair met in a bar, hit it off, and had a baby, the result would be this chair, from furniture company Nobody & Co. It’s called the Bibliochaise, and for lazy readers (aren’t we all?), it’s the library of the future. The Bibliochaise — which really looks more like a throne — holds five meters of books, which works out to about 300 of your favorite classics. (via The Bibliochaise Bookshelf Chair Is a Miniature Library for Your Apartment | Swimmingly)

300 books, you say? And how many Norton Critical Editions are there? Nearly 300, you say? Hmmm…


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Quiz: Judging a Book By Its Subject Headings

Need a crash course in a classic? Look no further than the page before the first page—the subject headings, care of the Library of Congress, on the copyright page give it all away and can prove to be an excellent study guide. (Also can provide a good laugh on just the right sort of day. See: Jane Eyre.)

1.Boys. Shoe shiners. Poor children. New York (N.Y.). Street children.

2. Gentry. Ventriloquists. Pennsylvania.

3. Physicians’ spouses. Adultery. Middle class.

4. Russia—History. Russia—Officials and employees.

5. Sea stories, American. New York (N.Y.). Slave trade. Copyists. Sailors.

6. Swindlers and swindling. Swindlers and swindling in literature. Mississippi River. Steamboats.

7. Actresses. Mistresses. Young women.

8. Teenage boys. Criminals. Satire.

9. Orphans. Gardens. Friendship. Sick children. Yorkshire.

10. Triangles. Rejection. Yorkshire. Rural families. Foundlings.

11. Governesses. Mentally ill women. England.

12. Appearance. Conduct of life. Portraits.

13. Magicians. Germany. Devil.

14. Canada—Social life and customs. City and town life. Canada—In literature.

15. Irish—India. Orphans. Lamas. Boys.

16. Communal living. Collective farms. Farm life.

17. Wessex. People with visual disabilities. Mothers and sons. Mate selection. Heathlands. Adultery.

18. Lithuanian Americans. Chicago (Ill.) Working class. Stockyards. Immigrants.

19. Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc. Fathers and daughters. Castaways. Magicians. Islands

20. Fathers and daughter. Exiles.

21. Villages. France.

22. Infants switched at birth. Impostors and imposture. Passing (Identity). Trials (Murder). Conjoined twins. Race relations.

23. Physicians. London. Multiple personality.

24. Dentists—California.

(Answers after the jump!)

Read more …


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The winner of our March Madness bracket has been decided! Not Connecticut huskies, but a man-bug thing. Close enough.
Thanks to all who submitted brackets (winning one to be announced later today) and voted to help us decide which title would be crowned champion. We hope you enjoyed following the action and that you’ve been inspired to pick up (or read again) one of these classics.

The winner of our March Madness bracket has been decided! Not Connecticut huskies, but a man-bug thing. Close enough.

Thanks to all who submitted brackets (winning one to be announced later today) and voted to help us decide which title would be crowned champion. We hope you enjoyed following the action and that you’ve been inspired to pick up (or read again) one of these classics.


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